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Welcome to Southwest General Health Center

More Than a Hospital. We Are a Community.

One thing everyone wants for themselves and their loved ones is a long, healthy life. Southwest General Health Center is an award-winning hospital in Middleburg Heights, Ohio serving the Greater Cleveland area. We take great pride in serving the people of our community and strive to provide each and every patient with exceptional health care. In addition to our patients’ physical needs, we provide them with resources for mental, emotional and spiritual support for an optimal healing experience.

Man on swing with child

Providing Patients With the Services They Need

Southwest General was founded in response to a devastating, post-World War I flu epidemic, during which many area residents died while being transported to the nearest Cleveland hospital. Concerned with the need for a local hospital, members of the community rallied together and raised $100,000 to create a new medical facility that could provide the sick with the care and attention they needed. We commemorate the impressive work of our founders by continuously expanding and improving our services to better meet the medical needs of our community.

In the beginning, Southwest General was a 32-bed hospital in Berea. Today, we have more than 350-beds and provide routine and emergency medical services to the people of southwestern Cuyahoga, northern Medina and eastern Lorain counties.

Compassionate Medical Care

We take our responsibility as a health care provider very seriously. Caring for patients goes beyond prescribing medication and bandaging wounds— it is our job to listen to people and work with them to provide compassionate care that addresses all of their needs. Whatever situation brings you and your family to our doors, you can trust that our team will be ready to help you with exceptional care and attention.

Featured Services

Middleburg Heights Hospital | Southwest General Health Center
Call Us440-816-8000
  • Slide1 Background

    Flu Alert

    Visitor Restrictions

    to protect our patients, staff and visitors

    View Restrictions
Scroll
Hospital Interior and Exterior Photo

Welcome to Southwest General Health Center

More Than a Hospital. We Are a Community.

One thing everyone wants for themselves and their loved ones is a long, healthy life. Southwest General Health Center is an award-winning hospital in Middleburg Heights, Ohio serving the Greater Cleveland area. We take great pride in serving the people of our community and strive to provide each and every patient with exceptional health care. In addition to our patients’ physical needs, we provide them with resources for mental, emotional and spiritual support for an optimal healing experience.

Man on swing with child

Providing Patients With the Services They Need

Southwest General was founded in response to a devastating, post-World War I flu epidemic, during which many area residents died while being transported to the nearest Cleveland hospital. Concerned with the need for a local hospital, members of the community rallied together and raised $100,000 to create a new medical facility that could provide the sick with the care and attention they needed. We commemorate the impressive work of our founders by continuously expanding and improving our services to better meet the medical needs of our community.

In the beginning, Southwest General was a 32-bed hospital in Berea. Today, we have more than 350-beds and provide routine and emergency medical services to the people of southwestern Cuyahoga, northern Medina and eastern Lorain counties.

Compassionate Medical Care

We take our responsibility as a health care provider very seriously. Caring for patients goes beyond prescribing medication and bandaging wounds— it is our job to listen to people and work with them to provide compassionate care that addresses all of their needs. Whatever situation brings you and your family to our doors, you can trust that our team will be ready to help you with exceptional care and attention.

Featured Services

MRI

Definition

A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan is an imaging test that uses powerful magnets and radio waves to create pictures of the body. It does not use radiation (x-rays).

Single MRI images are called slices. The images can be stored on a computer or printed on film. One exam produces dozens or sometimes hundreds of images.

Different types of MRI include:

Alternative Names

Magnetic resonance imaging; Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging

How the Test is Performed

You may be asked to wear a hospital gown or clothing without zippers or snaps (such as sweatpants and a t-shirt). Certain types of metal can cause blurry images.

You will lie on a narrow table, which slides into a large tunnel-shaped scanner.

Some exams require a special dye (contrast). Most of the time, the dye will be given through a vein (IV) in your hand or forearm before the test. The dye helps the radiologist see certain areas more clearly.

Small devices, called coils, may be placed around the head, arm, or leg, or around other areas to be studied. These help send and receive the radio waves, and improve the quality of the images.

During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch you from another room. The test lasts about 30 to 60 minutes, but may take longer.

How to Prepare for the Test

You may be asked not to eat or drink anything for 4 to 6 hours before the scan.

Tell your health care provider if you are afraid of close spaces (have claustrophobia). You may be given a medicine to help you feel sleepy and less anxious, or your provider may suggest an open MRI, in which the machine is not as close to the body.

Before the test, tell your provider if you have:

Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room with the MRI scanner:

How the Test will Feel

An MRI exam causes no pain. If you have difficulty lying still or are very nervous, you may be given a medicine to relax you. Too much movement can blur MRI images and cause errors.

The table may be hard or cold, but you can request a blanket or pillow. The machine produces loud thumping and humming noises when turned on. You can wear ear plugs to help reduce the noise.

An intercom in the room allows you to speak to someone at any time. Some MRIs have televisions and special headphones that you can use to help the time pass.

There is no recovery time, unless you were given a medicine to relax. After an MRI scan, you can resume your normal diet, activity, and medicines.

Why the Test is Performed

Having MRIs with other imaging methods can often help your provider make a diagnosis.

MRI images taken after a special dye (contrast) is delivered into your body may provide extra information about the blood vessels.

A magnetic resonance angiogram (MRA), is a form of magnetic resonance imaging that creates 3-dimensional pictures of blood vessels. It is often used when traditional angiography cannot be done.

Normal Results

A normal result means the body area being studied looks normal.

What Abnormal Results Mean

Results depend on the part of the body being examined and the nature of the problem. Different types of tissues send back different MRI signals. For example, healthy tissue sends back a slightly different signal than cancerous tissue. Consult your provider with any questions and concerns.

Risks

MRI does not use ionizing radiation. No side effects from the magnetic fields and radio waves have been reported.

The most common type of contrast (dye) used is gadolinium. It is very safe. Allergic reactions rarely occur. However, gadolinium can be harmful to people with kidney problems who are on dialysis. Tell your provider before the test if you have kidney problems.

The strong magnetic fields created during an MRI can cause heart pacemakers and other implants not to work as well. The magnets can also cause a piece of metal inside your body to move or shift.

References

Litt H, Carpenter JP. Magnetic resonance imaging. In: Cronenwett JL, Johnston KW, eds. Rutherford's Vascular Surgery. 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 23.

Wahl RL. Imaging. In: Niederhuber JE, Armitage JO, Doroshow JH, Kastan MB, Tepper JE, eds. Abeloff's Clinical Oncology. 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2014:chap 18.

Wilkinson ID, Graves MJ. Magnetic resonance imaging. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology. 6th ed. New York, NY: Elsevier; 2015:chap 5.


Review Date: 7/3/2016
Reviewed By: Jason Levy, MD, Northside Radiology Associates, Atlanta, GA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.
The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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Middleburg Heights Hospital | Southwest General Health Center
Call Us440-816-8000
  • Slide1 Background

    Flu Alert

    Visitor Restrictions

    to protect our patients, staff and visitors

    View Restrictions
Scroll
Hospital Interior and Exterior Photo

Welcome to Southwest General Health Center

More Than a Hospital. We Are a Community.

One thing everyone wants for themselves and their loved ones is a long, healthy life. Southwest General Health Center is an award-winning hospital in Middleburg Heights, Ohio serving the Greater Cleveland area. We take great pride in serving the people of our community and strive to provide each and every patient with exceptional health care. In addition to our patients’ physical needs, we provide them with resources for mental, emotional and spiritual support for an optimal healing experience.

Man on swing with child

Providing Patients With the Services They Need

Southwest General was founded in response to a devastating, post-World War I flu epidemic, during which many area residents died while being transported to the nearest Cleveland hospital. Concerned with the need for a local hospital, members of the community rallied together and raised $100,000 to create a new medical facility that could provide the sick with the care and attention they needed. We commemorate the impressive work of our founders by continuously expanding and improving our services to better meet the medical needs of our community.

In the beginning, Southwest General was a 32-bed hospital in Berea. Today, we have more than 350-beds and provide routine and emergency medical services to the people of southwestern Cuyahoga, northern Medina and eastern Lorain counties.

Compassionate Medical Care

We take our responsibility as a health care provider very seriously. Caring for patients goes beyond prescribing medication and bandaging wounds— it is our job to listen to people and work with them to provide compassionate care that addresses all of their needs. Whatever situation brings you and your family to our doors, you can trust that our team will be ready to help you with exceptional care and attention.

Featured Services